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What To Do About Ice Buildup in Your Gutters

ice buildup in your gutters

The best thing you can do for your gutters is to keep them clean year round.

Here along the Mason-Dixon Line we experienced our first frost of the season this past week. It was a chilly reminder that, any day now, the temperatures will drop below freezing and the snow will start falling. When that happens you might be worried about how your gutters will handle all that extra weight without coming down.

Be Proactive

There are two things you can do to ensure your gutters will make it through another winter. The first is to replace aging systems and make sure everything is in working order on newer systems. The other is to clean and inspect your gutters thoroughly at least twice a year, and to give them a once over after heavy storms. A clean gutter will allow every bit of melted snow and ice to drain instead of refreezing and building up into ice dams. If you’re extremely worried about ice dams in your gutters you can prevent them by having heating panels installed that warm the gutters and downspout and prevent water from freezing.

Or Don’t Stress

If you’ve done the work of cleaning your gutter they should be able to hold up to regular winter precipitation. Unless you know for sure there’s a weak spot in your gutters, or there’s water entering your home because the ice dam has damaged your shingles, you shouldn’t have much to worry about. If you’re unsure about the strength of your gutters, or worried about possible roof damage from last winter, call a professional to come out and take a look.

Contact Topper Construction Today!

If you’re interested in having a roof system or siding installed in your home, or would like a free estimate, contact Topper Construction. With Topper Construction, you’ll see the benefit of nearly three decades of experience. Contact Topper Construction at 301-874-0220 or email us at info@topperconstruction.com if you are interested in learning more. We can help you with projects in Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Northern Virginia.

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